Policy for Emerging Technology

A Direct Air Capture Consortium

After conversations with dozens of stakeholders in the space of carbon reduction and removal, I developed a whitepaper detailing how to advance the thirty-year future of carbon capture using industrial techniques by integrating existing efforts into a consortium-based approach. The PDF is available here.

Harms-based evaluation for AI

With collaborator Alan Ho (from the Google AI Quantum team), we describe some of the existing authorities and approaches for ensuring better outcomes for AI technologies by focusing on specific harms and highlighting the 'red line' for national security applications: human decision making. The PDF is available here.

Future of the network: quantum edition

For ETSI's quantum safe event, I presented a short address covering the role of quantum networking and classical cryptography as the world prepares for a world with advanced quantum technologies. Covering timelines and pathways for integration, the talk delves further into the future than my usual fare.

Automation and physics

For my second TAPP blog post, I dig into how automation is playing out in building ever more complex quantum computing experiments, and what we can learn about the application of machine learning from experiences in this domain. The PDF is available here.

The Public Purpose Consortium

In this Policy Brief, I explore what a public purpose consortium is and why it can help integrate impact with science and technology in emering technologies. The PDF version is available here as well.

Research Communities as a Strategic Reserve in Times of Crisis

For my first TAPP blog post, I cover my experience with the COVID-19 High Performance Computing Consortium, and consider how we can engender a strategic scientific reserve for times of crisis. The PDF version is available here as well.

Keynote: Frontiers in Quantum Information Science

I presented a 45 minute Keynote at the IEEE Quantum Week on October 16th; the recording is available for those interested in my perspective on quantum information science policy and opportunities for future science in the area.